Saturday, November 22, 2008

Fecal Encephalopathy


(S****for brains) JACHO hit us again. I really wonder if they have any clue on what really goes on in a hospital. We used to be able to keep some medications in the OR because you never know when you will need them. These are things like lidocaine with epi, heparin, thrombin, surgicel, pitocin for the OBS, DDAVP to decrease bleeding, etc. Well JACHO has determined that these need to be kept in the pharmacy or at least somewhere other than where they will be needed. So, when the need arises which is usually out of the blue the circulating nurse has to run out of the room to find it or we have to call someone to go and try to find it instead of just having it. God forbid the nurse actually stays in the room to help care for the patient. This is especially a problem for trauma cases where we are going straight from the ER to the OR. Apparently we can't have a generic pharmaceutical bag or set for each case so at least all the meds could at least be put into the room either.
Why can't JACHO do something that will really improve patient care, like decrease the paperwork so nurses can actually care for patients and help them be more efficient. Oh, nevermind, I forgot, they are self supporting bureaucrats from the high admistratosphere.

3 comments:

Andrew Garland said...

Put the meds in a small cabinet outside the treatment room. Put on a sign "Pharmacy Extension P341", approved by the pharmacy of course.

It can be locked. Everyone can have a key.

Does JACHO have to publish its reasons, to be available for criticism? What are their reasons?

Can a person get high on petocin or surgicel?

SeaSpray said...

I am cracking up at the titles of your posts Throckmorton! LOL!

Your even causing me to want to overcome math anxiety because your equations are so interesting. ;)

I also couldn't resist and looked up the Myers-Briggs tests and took it. Seemed to be right on with a lot of it although I did take issue with a little of it. Going to take it again. There were some questions that I wrestled with and could've gone both ways. Although... I know these tests are constructed to hone in on the ambiguity with other questions. And I wonder if the results would be different if given through a psychologist? I LOVE this stuff! Human behavior is so intriguing!

I'm Looking forward to posting comments on your other posts.

Great stuff!

Now I am off to do the kinds of things people have to do when they are at a point in their life when "you have to do... what you have to do."

SeaSpray said...

That's just scary Throckmorton. I assume in the OR if you need these things something serious is going on and so pt quality of care is being compromised.

I really don't understand.

I am a lay person and can appreciate the absurdity and potential risks. Why can't the medical staff UNITE and challenge these things?

What was the gain in JCAHO's implementing this regulation?